On the Right Track

Posted On March 29, 2018
March 29, 2018

The argument about horse riding off track on Chorleywood Commmon is ongoing.

* The views and opinions expressed in this thread are those of readers credited at the end of each post and do not
necessarily reflect the views of Chorleywood Magazine

22 Oct 2017

Chorleywood Parish Council incorrectly and unlawfully inform the public via their website and signs, that horse riding on the common is permissive and that riding is only permitted on a designated track.

CPC asked the British Horse Society to advise on the horse track and the associated signage.  This resulted in the BHS getting legal advice which resulted in them having to inform CPC that they had acted “beyond their powers in purporting to make byelaw 17(2) of the 1995 byelaws and accordingly that byelaw is ultra vires the Parish Council, invalid and unenforceable”.  If CPC wish to restrict riders to a designated track they will have to make a valid byelaw which requires Three Rivers District Council to lawfully delegate to the Parish Council the discharge of the District Council’s function, or TRDC should make the byelaws themselves.  Similarly if CPC wish to erect signs, formal delegated authority has to be given after (and only if) a valid byelaw is made.  Further information regarding the legal advice can be found on the Chorleywood Magazine website (search ‘on the right track’).

Anne Pearson

21 Dec 2016

I read with interest Mr Tony Child’s opinion regarding Chorleywood Parish Council’s invalid and unenforceable byelaws. The British Horse Society have been extremely generous with their information and are clearly willing to assist CPC. I note from CPC’s Open Spaces reports that they initially approached BHS regarding assistance with signage on the common. CPC now appear to be acting in a rude and ignorant manner by ignoring the BHS, meantime since it is not only the byelaw regarding horse riding that is invalid and unenforceable, but all of their byelaws therefore they will not be able to rely on them next time the common is invaded by travellers. I also note from their Open Spaces report that the TRDC legal team will no longer assist next time travellers set up camp on the common. Parish Councils have few duties but many powers. If they elect to use their powers, they should get it right. It seems to me that far too much time and energy is spent trying to graze cattle on the common, and speaking as a regular dog walker who raised the alarm and helped round the cows up the last time they escaped (herding them away from shepherds bridge car park) it appears that the cattle fencing and the byelaws are equally useless and cannot be relied upon.

Kim Hatfield

1 Dec 2016

Chorleywood Parish Council had asked The British Horse Society (BHS) to give assistance/advice regarding signage on the Common.

The BHS advised that it would be inappropriate to comment on CPC’s proposals since Counsel was reviewing riders’ claims for access on the Common.

Once Counsel’s advice was received, the BHS wrote to CPC advising the following :

The British Horse Society has sought advice as to the legality of byelaw 17(2) relating to horses.

 Byelaw 17(2) provides that “[w]here any part of the Common has, by notices placed in conspicuous positions on the Common, been set apart by the Council as an area where horse-riding is permitted, no person shall without the consent of the Council ride a horse on any other part of the Common”.

 These byelaws were made by the Parish Council on 20 January 1995 and are said to have come into operation on 18 April 1995.

 Section 1(1) of the Commons Act 1899 as amended by section 179(3) of the Local Government Act 1972 provides that “[t]he Council of a district may make a scheme for the regulation and management of any common within their district with a view to the expenditure of money on the drainage, levelling and improvement of the common, and to the making of byelaws and regulations for the prevention of nuisances and the preservation of order on the common”.

 Section 2 of the 1899 Act sets out the procedure for making a scheme. Further provision was made by the Commons Regulations 1935. With effect from 20 March 1982, the 1935 Regulations were revoked and replaced by the Commons (Schemes) Regulations 1982. The Parish Council is not a district council for the purposes of the 1899 Act or otherwise.

 The 1935 Regulations were in force when Chorleywood Urban District Council, pursuant to section 1(1) of the 1899 Act, made a scheme for the regulation and management of Chorleywood Common. The scheme was made on 11 October 1954 and was approved by the Minister of Agriculture & Fisheries on 29 November 1954. The 1954 scheme authorised the Urban District Council (but not the Parish Council) “to make, revoke, and alter byelaws [for] prohibiting or regulating the riding, driving or breaking in of horses without lawful authority on any part of the Common”. The 1954 scheme remains in force.

 Pursuant to section 1 of the 1899 Act and the 1954 scheme byelaws were made by the Urban District Council which came into operation on 1 July 1958 and provided (inter alia) that “[n]o person shall without lawful authority ride or drive any horse on the Common except on the tracks approved by the [Urban District Council] and indicated by notice-boards set up in conspicuous positions on the Common”. The 1958 byelaws are no longer in force.

 With effect from 1 April 1974, Local Government outside Greater London was reorganised pursuant to the 1972 Act. In general the functions of the Urban District Council were transferred to the newly created Three Rivers District Council which became the district council for the purposes of the 1899 Act, the 1935 regulations and the 1954 scheme including in respect of the making of byelaws.

 On 5 December 1977, the Parish Council resolved to make byelaws “acting in discharge of the functions of the Three Rivers District Council pursuant to arrangements made under Section 101 of the Local Government Act 1972 in pursuance of [the 1954 scheme] made by the former Urban District Council of Chorleywood and approved by the Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries under Section 1(1) of the Commons Act 1899 with respect to Chorleywood Common.” The said byelaws were confirmed by the Home Secretary and came into operation on 1 March 1978.

 The 1978 byelaws were made by the Parish Council pursuant to delegated authority conferred on the Parish Council by the Three Rivers District Council. The 1978 byelaws are no longer in force.

 The most recent byelaws with respect to Chorleywood Common were made by the Parish Council on 20 January 1995 relying on section 1 of the 1899 Act. The 1995 byelaws are said to have come into operation on 18 April 1995. Although Chorleywood Common is defined in the 1995 byelaws by reference to the 1954 scheme no further reference is made in the 1995 byelaws to the 1954 scheme or to the 1982 Regulations. Nor is any reference made in the 1995 byelaws to the exercise by the Three Rivers District Council in favour of the Parish Council of any power of delegation conferred by section 101 of the 1972 Act.

 The legislation, regulations and schemes relating to the regulation and management of Chorleywood Common all expressly confer functions on the Urban District Council or the Three Rivers District Council, including the function of making byelaws. No such functions are conferred on the Parish Council.

Absent formal delegation authorising to the Parish Council to discharge the relevant function of the Three Rivers District Council under section 1(1) of the 1899 Act, the making of the 1995 byelaws by the Parish Council would be ultra vires the Parish Council and accordingly the 1995 byelaws would be unlawful, invalid and unenforceable.

 Replies to enquiries made of the Parish Council and the Three Rivers District Council under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 have not resulted in the disclosure of any document which establishes that there was any relevant exercise of delegation by the Three Rivers District Council in favour of the Parish Council. It appears that the Parish Council had no delegated authority in relation to the making of the 1995 byelaws and accordingly the 1995 byelaws including byelaw 17(2) are ultra vires the Parish Council, invalid and unenforceable.

Mrs Merritt acknowledged receipt in May, and confirmed that she would advise Councillors and “would be in touch in the near future to discuss further”.

Since then there has been no further response from CPC, and surprisingly no mention of this matter has been made at the last three Open Spaces meetings, although signage is reported to be something to be given priority.

The current signs regarding the “invalid and unenforceable” byelaws, together with all the unlawful signs relating to the horse track obviously should be removed.

Horse riders can and will continue to ride within their rights, with open access as permitted by s193 LPA 1925, however CPC are being negligent by retaining signs which are unlawful and misinform the public.  This is a breach of duty and contravenes human rights.

Anne Pearson

July 2015

As you will be aware there are differing views about where horses are permitted to be on the common.  Chorleywood Common is an Urban Common and as such horse riders have a lawful right to open access, however CPC claim that they have created lawful byelaws to restrict horse riders to a track.

Horse riders would not be unreasonable and ride on the Cricket Pitch or the Golf Course, however it is often not safe to ride where CPC would like us to ride as the track often has walkers, loose dogs (who are not horse friendly), pushchairs and cyclists on it.  The track seems to be the most popular place to be.

Recently when we were riding on the track we came across a family picnic on the track.  All the children had balloons and as we approached, one child got up and ran towards us waving a balloon.  Luckily our horses coped with this situation well, many wouldn’t.

As well as picnics it is not uncommon to come across kites flying and games of football, rounders etc on the track.  It is not unreasonable for any of these activities to take place on the common, and similarly it is not unreasonable for riders to choose to ride on a quieter part of the common, away from activities.

CPC claim that if horse riders deviate from the track they are putting children and dogs at risk.  This couldn’t be further from the truth.  There are times when the track is so busy, it is safer for horse riders to take a different route.

CPC  have now decided to host annual carving events involving chainsaws, and treasure hunts on one section of the track.  There is also to be a sawmill adjacent to this section of the track. Obviously when such events take place horse riders will have to take a different route. 

It is not lawful to punish someone for a crime that they haven’t committed.  It follows that if there is not a valid law in place you should not be able to accuse someone of breaking it.  This is a form of abuse and there are laws against that. 

It is interesting that Harpenden Common, which also has a track and is also an Urban Common with open access rights, the byelaws state that “No person shall ride a horse except (a) on a designated route for riding or (b) in the exercise of a lawful right”, which means you can ride everywhere, and it is accepted by all.

 Anne Pearson

Chorleywood Common is an Urban Common and as such horse riders have a lawful right to open access, however CPC claim that they have created lawful byelaws to restrict horse riders to a track.

The track often has walkers, loose dogs, pushchairs and cyclists on it. CPC claim that if horse riders deviate from the track they put children and dogs at risk. It is often safer for horse riders to take a different route, they would not be unreasonable and ride on the Cricket Pitch or the Golf Course. Currently there are no valid byelaws restricting riders to any part of the Chorleywood Common and section 193 of the Law of Property Act 1925 allows Horse Riders open access.

 Anne Pearson

 

Photo © James McHugh

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